New paper: Citizen science in China’s water resources monitoring: current status and future prospects

There is something special in the first peer-review publication. It's a milestone and an important stage in the development of the researcher that is leading on it. For PhD students, it is an important stage - instead of a consumer of academic publications, you're becoming a producer of scientific knowledge. This new publication "Citizen science … Continue reading New paper: Citizen science in China’s water resources monitoring: current status and future prospects

New paper: Innovation in Citizen Science – Perspectives on Science-Policy Advances

From time to time, there are opportunities to become a co-author with a lot of people that you are very happy to be associated with - to demonstrate a shared piece of work that represents a common understanding. The participation in the first European Citizen Science Association conference in 2016 created such an opportunity, with a … Continue reading New paper: Innovation in Citizen Science – Perspectives on Science-Policy Advances

Being philosophical about crowdsourced geographic information

This is a post by Renee Sieber and myself, providing a bit of a background on why we wrote the paper “The epistemology(s) of volunteered geographic information: a critique” – this is in addition to what I’ve written about it in this blog post

Geo: Geography and Environment

By Renée Sieber (McGill University, Canada) and Muki Haklay (University College London, UK)

Our recent paper, The epistemology(s) of volunteered geographic information: a critique, started from a discussion we had about changes within the geographic information science (GIScience) research communities over the past two decades. We’ve both been working in the area of participatory geographic information systems (GIS) and critical studies of geographic information science (GIScience) since the late 1990s, where we engaged with people from all walks of life with the information that is available in GIS. Many times we’d work together with people to create new geographic information and maps. Our goal was to help reflect their point of view of the world and their knowledge about local conditions, not always aim for universal rules and principles. For example, the image below is from a discussion with the community in Hackney Wick, London, where individuals collaborated to…

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