The Commission on Use and User Issues of the International Cartographic Association (ICA) is currently working on a new handbook specifically addressing the application of user research methods and techniques in the area of geographical information and its applications.

In order to share experiences and interesting case studies a workshop is organized by the Commission, in collaboration with UCL, on the day preceding GISRUK 2010, Tuesday, 13th April 2010.

The programme for the workshop is now completed and the programme and abstracts for the papers that will be discussed during the meeting are available here.

For information on the commission, visit the website of the ICA Commission on Use and User Issues and to register to the workshop  follow the instructions on the GISRUK2010 website.

Geographical Information Science Research UK (GISRUK) is a research conference that has been taking place in different university campuses around the UK (and once in Ireland) since 1993. Despite the name, it is open not just to researchers from the UK, but also to international participants, who are very welcome.

For me, GISRUK was the first international conference in which I presented a paper eleven years ago, so I have a soft spot for it. It was very friendly and welcoming for a starting research student (which I was at the time). It was especially useful to discover that all the famous academics who attended it were friendly and open to questions.

The conference will be held at UCL in April 2010, and the call for papers is now out, so consider submitting a paper.

The papers are rather short, about 1500 words, so there is plenty of time to write one in time for the deadline of the end of November.

Chris Parker, a PhD student at Loughborough University, organised a dedicated Volunteered Geographical Information research group site on ResearchGate. While I dislike the term – I usually interpret it as the version of ‘volunteered’ as in ‘mum volunteered me to help the old lady cross the street’ – there is no point in trying to change it. When Mike Goodchild coins an acronym, it will stick; it’s sort of a GIScience law!

If you are interested in user-generated geographical content, crowdsourced geographical information, commons-based peer-produced geographical information, or any other way to call this phenomena (for example VGI) – join the group. It will be good to keep in touch, share information and discuss research aspects.
If you are researching in this area you are also welcome to submit a paper to GISRUK 2010 which will be hosted at UCL – we are keen to have a VGI element in the programme, considering that UCL is the host of OpenStreetMap .

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